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Edward M. Kian analyses differences between sports coverage in print and online April 18, 2009

Posted by Raquel in symposium.
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Edward M. Kian from the University of Florida presented his research paper “Framing Differences in Gender-Related Sport Coverage by Internet Sites ands Newspapers.”

He said new media are changing the way news is gathered, distributed, accessed and consumed. And also, Internet readers tend to be younger. Plus, throughout history sports have served as an institution to preserve the power of men over women.

Because there is not much research done on the subject, he set out to determine if any significant differences are present and how the newer media use descriptors to frame coverage of the same men’s and women’s sport, specifically in tennis. He sought to find whether the popularity of sports across genders remains the same or not.

Kian’s methodology was taking print and online articles and did a content analysis of three daily newspapers (The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, USA Today)

His results pointed toward that the internet was more likely to just use the AP stories to publish. He also found that humor was more likely to be used on men’s sport stories than women’s.

The big surprise was that on print articles, women stories included much more descriptive factors of the physical appearance of the players, versus online where stories focused more on the skills.

“Internet sport journalism is serving much more as a challenge to these notions than traditional mediums,” he said.

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